all – Engineering Leadership – Institute for Engineering Leadership http://ielstaging.net Thu, 10 Jan 2019 18:00:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.4.16 TechLaunch & Frugal Innovation Info-session AY2018/2019 Semester II http://ielstaging.net/techlaunch-frugalinnovation-infosession-2019/ Thu, 10 Jan 2019 18:00:52 +0000 http://ielstaging.net/?p=8582 INFORMATION SESSION Join us for an info-session about the upcoming TechLaunch and Frugal Innovation modules on the 10th of January 2019 (630-730PM) @ E-Cubes SIGN UP FOR SESSION See you there!  

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INFORMATION SESSION

Join us for an info-session about the upcoming TechLaunch and Frugal Innovation modules on the
10th of January 2019 (630-730PM) @ E-Cubes

SIGN UP FOR SESSION

See you there!

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Internship & Job Opportunities http://ielstaging.net/internship-job-opportunities/ Thu, 06 Dec 2018 16:34:43 +0000 http://www.pisteuomedia.com/nus/?p=3471 Pending updates. Please check in mid-December 2018 CLICK HERE TO SUBMIT JOBS/INTERNSHIPS AVAILABLE IN YOUR COMPANY!

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Pending updates. Please check in mid-December 2018

CLICK HERE TO SUBMIT JOBS/INTERNSHIPS AVAILABLE IN YOUR COMPANY!

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EHIVE: 14 NOV http://ielstaging.net/e-hive-14nov/ Wed, 14 Nov 2018 18:00:58 +0000 http://ielstaging.net/?p=8102 The post EHIVE: 14 NOV appeared first on Engineering Leadership - Institute for Engineering Leadership.

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EHIVE 14 NOV http://ielstaging.net/e-hive-14nov/ Wed, 14 Nov 2018 18:00:47 +0000 http://ielstaging.net/?p=8097     If you want to know more – kindly email to iel_events@nus.edu.sg

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E-HIVE 14 NOV 2018 Poster PNG

 

 

If you want to know more – kindly email to iel_events@nus.edu.sg

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Corporate Leadership in Action: Straight talk from an Engineer Leader http://ielstaging.net/seah-moon-ming-lecture-edm/ Fri, 26 Oct 2018 18:30:52 +0000 http://ielstaging.net/?p=8032 The post Corporate Leadership in Action: Straight talk from an Engineer Leader appeared first on Engineering Leadership - Institute for Engineering Leadership.

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The 3Cs of Leadership – Take Charge, Connect and Have Courage! http://ielstaging.net/smm-leadership-lecture-article/ Fri, 26 Oct 2018 13:36:48 +0000 http://ielstaging.net/?p=8521     The 3Cs of Leadership – Take Charge, Connect and Have Courage! A leadership lecture by Mr Seah Moon Ming, Chairman, SMRT (26 October 2018) By Elijah Ng, Student Writer Mr Seah Moon Ming was thrust into the public spotlight when he apologised at a press conference on SMRT’s behalf by bowing. Since then, […]

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CoBrand-InstituteForEnginLeader

 

 

The 3Cs of Leadership – Take Charge, Connect and Have Courage!

A leadership lecture by Mr Seah Moon Ming, Chairman, SMRT

(26 October 2018)

By Elijah Ng, Student Writer

Mr Seah Moon Ming was thrust into the public spotlight when he apologised at a press conference on SMRT’s behalf by bowing. Since then, to focus on turning around SMRT, he has also stepped down as the CEO of Pavilion Energy. He has been lauded as the beacon of hope for the company.

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At the NUS Engineering Distinguished Leaders Lecture held on 26 October 2018 in the Engineering Auditorium, Mr Seah shared his core motivations and values that had shaped his decisions and his leadership style.

As a prelude to his sharing, Mr Seah first remarked that being a leader was more than just knowing about management and leadership theories. He impressed upon the audience that leadership had to be practised.

True to his no-nonsense approach, Mr Seah then laid out his personal framework for corporate leadership, his 3Cs: Take Charge, Make Connections, and Have Courage.

Taking charge, according to Mr Seah, was the difference between being a manger and being a leader. He pointed out that while managers are meant to get things done, leaders must play a wholly different role by providing the vision and the top-down driving force of the organization. This was even more crucial in today’s culture as young talents desire more than just a “what” and “how” to get their jobs done: they now ask for a “why”. It is hence the job of the leader to provide that purpose to his peers and employees — to energise and “charge” them up.

This means that leaders must “walk the talk”. Recalling his time at ST Electronics, Mr Seah shared that as he was trying to encourage efforts in innovation and patent creation in the company, he led by example by publishing a few patents himself.

Mr Seah’s presence on the ground has become a known fact in the public eye. From interacting with commuters on the train to visiting his staff during the weekends, it is of little surprise that establishing connections is also one of Mr Seah’s core values. “Show me the leader and I will know his men. Show me the men and I will know their leader,” Mr Seah quoted as he stressed the need for leaders to establish authentic connections with their employees.

Lastly, Mr Seah emphasised the need for a leader to have courage. It was clear to all that this point was one he felt very deeply about. It takes courage to take ownership and responsibility for so many; to confront issues head on without blaming others.

It was upon this belief that Mr Seah felt the need to apologise on SMRT’s behalf and make public declarations of the company’s intent for transparency in all matters. The need to publicly admit all the problems weighed on him. He felt that being open was the only way to regain the public’s trust and re-build the public’s confidence in his organization.

 

People need to believe you can keep your word and deliver on your promise”

 

It takes courage to take charge and to make the right decisions at the right time, Mr Seah re-emphasised. Although this did not mean that he always succeeded, Mr Seah shared that despite setbacks that he had faced throughout his career, he felt at peace with the fact that they were learning experiences and that he did at least try his best. In the business world, there was always the easy choice of trading social benefit for company benefits. It takes courage to reject this false dichotomy and figure a way out to have a balance of both. Courage is required to brave the short-term sacrifices and reap the long-term benefits, Mr Seah concluded.

Adding on to this, Mr Seah highlighted the need for leaders to be anchored by a strong value system that emphasises integrity — especially in this day and age of extreme volatility. Principles allow leaders to face their problems with courage and strength; it was the reason he could look beyond the bottom line and be emboldened to do the right thing.

To conclude his lecture, Mr Seah revisited his initial point, using the SARS outbreak as an example. The engineers working to develop an infra-red sensor for temperature taking had to overcome many odds. In an act of great leadership, they worked at hospitals despite it being unsafe and did the impossible by convincing the factory to open two lines for their product. The values that drove them led to a revolutionary, life-saving product.

This, to Mr Seah, was leadership. It is the art of putting those values together: to make common people do uncommon things.

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Failure as a Badge of Honour http://ielstaging.net/failure-as-a-badge-honour/ Wed, 24 Oct 2018 06:56:40 +0000 http://ielstaging.net/?p=8377 Failure as a Badge of Honour A sharing session with Adjunct Professor Lim Soon Hock and Dr KH Liew Article by Lim Teck Heng, Student Writer for IEL “For our sharing today, I must tell you upfront that I have crafted it to be controversial,” Prof Lim Soon Hock began the session with an attention-grabbing […]

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Failure as a Badge of Honour

A sharing session with Adjunct Professor Lim Soon Hock and Dr KH Liew

Article by Lim Teck Heng, Student Writer for IEL

“For our sharing today, I must tell you upfront that I have crafted it to be controversial,” Prof Lim Soon Hock began the session with an attention-grabbing disclaimer. And unconventional it was.

From the get go, Prof Lim impressed upon the audience his firm belief that failure and success are not two mutually exclusive concepts. Taking us through various dictionary definitions of failure, he explained how failure is invariably taken to mean the opposite of success, a view which he fervently disagrees with. Instead, he invoked the analogy of ying and yang in Chinese philosophy to explain his view on the nexus between success and failure. Just as ying and yang are elements that harmonise with one another to keep our universe perfectly balanced, success and failure are experiences that can and must coexist in our life for our holistic development.

Prof Lim had observed a marked disparity between people’s attitudes to failure and success. In management and board meetings, success and accomplishment are often glorified, but failure – in the past, present, or future – is this elephant in the room that no one wants to talk about. According to him, successes ought to be celebrated, but it is more important to learn from failures, and to fully understand what can go wrong in any endeavour.

Prof Lim made use of a clever yet simple thought experiment to expose our inherent tendencies to view failure in a negative light. He asked the audience how many steps were taken if someone had taken three steps forward and then two steps back. The reflexive answer might be one step if we only accounted for the net number of steps taken. But the correct answer is five because we should not discount the two steps backwards; there are gains to be made and vital lessons to be learnt even when you move backwards in life.

Prof Lim went on to justify why he did not see failure as the antithesis to success. He argued that if our endeavours contribute to our next big win, they are not failures from his point of view, even though conventional wisdom might brand them so. He encouraged the audience to chase their curiosity without necessarily having financial objectives in mind all the time, because he believes that financial rewards will naturally follow when we manage to succeed in our non-financial objectives.

Also, Prof Lim reminded the audience not to be afraid of pivoting from the lessons that they have learnt from failing. He offered this incisive quote: Businesses do not fail; people do. According to him, what goes wrong in a venture is often not the business or the idea but the execution. We can only expect success if we learn from failures and fine tune how we execute our ideas.

He gave the example of the struggles of a fintech start up that he mentored. This start up was trying to make an impact in the crowded e-procurement space for SMEs, where the barriers to entry are low. Fortunately, the founders were sensible enough to change course timely to avoid more financial haemorrhage. After an in-depth study of the customers’ needs. they pivoted on their experience and insight to offer cash flow funding instead using blockchain and smart contract. In doing so, they are solving a chronic problem in the last mile of a transaction, which earned them invaluable support from IBM and the Monetary Authority of Singapore. Again, Prof Lim stressed that any endeavour is not a failure when it leads you to the right idea.

On the other hand, as a negative example, he highlighted the liquidation of a company that he had previously been involved in as an Independent Director, which possessed unique intellectual property but could not capitalise on that advantage. He explained that the management was reluctant to acknowledge mistakes and was always pinning the blame on others. From the vastly different fortunes of these two companies, Prof Lim wanted to drive home the importance of recognising failure when it happens and adjusting your game plan accordingly.

Prof Lim wrapped up his section of the sharing by calling upon students to fail fast and learn fast. Compared to his generation, young people have a longer runway to make mistakes and learn from them, to earn the badge of honour.

Taking over from Prof Lim, Dr Liew tapped on his experience as a project management lecturer & practitioner to discuss the importance of learning about why things fail. He asked the audience if they thought projects could fail before they have even started. He recounted an anecdote about how a company managed to botch a multimillion tender bid because they left the submission of the documents to an external courier. The courier reached the tender office only a minute late, but the damage was already done. From this mishandled situation, Dr Liew wanted to reinforce the importance of checking through the smallest details, and not leaving things to chance. This complemented Prof Lim’s earlier claim that businesses do not fail but people do.

Dr Liew also echoed Prof Lim’s point about why we need to recognise failure and have a candid discussion about it. He shared his experience lobbying for the Ministry of Manpower to release anonymised case studies of industrial accidents into the public domain for everyone to learn from these failures, and how his efforts were met with initial resistance but eventually paid off.

Dr Liew claimed that when we do not study risks and past failures carefully, disaster could strike and repeat itself. He shared the examples of the space disasters of the Space Shuttle Challenger and Columbia to emphasise his point. The Space Shuttle Challenger disintegrated because of a seal failure, something seemingly insignificant. But NASA, the space agency of the United States, continued to neglect the minute operational details and history repeated itself less than twenty years later. The breakage of a mere foam insulation, dislodging a heat resistant tile, was enough to trigger the explosion of the Space Shuttle Columbia. On the back of sharing these case studies, Dr Liew ended off by encouraging the audience never to fail to learn.

During the Question & Answer segment, Prof Lim shared one last anecdote from a defining moment in his illustrious career that stayed with him after all these years. While working at Digital Equipment Corporation, he was headhunted by Compaq. He revealed that his Far East President in Digital, and close friends had dissuaded him from taking up the job because they were convinced that he would fail. They had good reasons and good intentions: after all, Compaq produced the most expensive personal computer in the market then, and it would be very difficult if not near impossible to sell it in large quantities in what was arguably the most difficult and price sensitive Asian market, which was lacking in purchasing power. For the first time in his life, Prof Lim was seriously entertaining the prospect of failure. But his track record in marketing quality products and services gave him the confidence to press on with his decision. Within five years, Compaq was number one in the Asia-Pacific region against all odds, and in seven years, achieved 1 billion dollars in sale from 30 million dollars. The irony was that his well-intentioned peers, in not wanting him to fail, would have inadvertently caused him not to succeed had he followed their advice.

Prof Lim left the audience with this empowering and inspiring message:

“The truth is that everyone is born for failure. People who learn how to win from failure and think everything is possible, get to enjoy success, if they do not give up. If you believe in the impossible, nothing gets done.

But if you believe in the possible, the impossible becomes possible.”

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Life-Saving Trolleys http://ielstaging.net/life-saving-trolleys-article/ Thu, 20 Sep 2018 08:31:09 +0000 http://ielstaging.net/?p=8368 The post Life-Saving Trolleys appeared first on Engineering Leadership - Institute for Engineering Leadership.

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Life Saving Trolleys http://ielstaging.net/life-saving-trolleys-article/ Thu, 20 Sep 2018 08:20:07 +0000 http://ielstaging.net/?p=8358   Life Saving Trolleys (15 September 2018) By Lim Teck Heng, IEL Student Writer Military Medicine Institute (MMI), the organisation in charge of SAF Medical Centres across the island, is one of the problem statement providers for InnoVenture 2018. To allow participants to gain insight into how inspections of the Emergency Trolley (E-Trolley) are conducted, […]

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Life Saving Trolleys

(15 September 2018)

By Lim Teck Heng, IEL Student Writer

Military Medicine Institute (MMI), the organisation in charge of SAF Medical Centres across the island, is one of the problem statement providers for InnoVenture 2018. To allow participants to gain insight into how inspections of the Emergency Trolley (E-Trolley) are conducted, MMI invited two groups of NUS students over to SAFTI Medical Centre across two separate days (20th and 24th September) to watch a live demonstration by SAF medics. We were there on 20th September to attend the first demonstration.

Ms Lee Xiao Qi, Healthcare Cluster Manager, she started off the session by explaining the nature of MMI’s operations. Akin to polyclinics in the civilian world, SAF Medical Centres provide primary healthcare services, but targeted at military personnel.

She proceeded to outline the problem that MMI faced with the E-Trolley. Every E-Trolley has a standardised layout and stock list of resuscitation drugs and equipment. Duty Medics are responsible for frequent checks on the E-Trolley to ensure that all the stocks are serviceable and in the right arrangement. The ability to retrieve the drugs and equipment readily greatly boosts the chances of saving the patient’s life in the case of a resuscitation case. Medics will sound off during the checks if they notice any expired, broken, or missing stocks so that swift replacement can be done. However, these thorough checks can be time-consuming, taking up entire mornings, and are prone to human error. Therefore, MMI hoped to enlist the help of students to devise a stocktaking method that was more streamlined and efficient, yet not compromising on accuracy.

After her briefing, students were allowed into the resuscitation room to watch a medic going through a routine check of the E-Trolley. Having been on the ground and understood the practical challenges, the medic could point out to the onlooking students those aspects of the inspection that were especially tedious. For example, he highlighted that the date format on the physical checklist differed from that on the drug packaging, so extra care had to be taken when verifying the expiry dates. This posed especial inconvenience to the medic who had to record down the expiry dates on the checklist at the start of every month.

Later on, students broke into groups and a medic was attached to each group. The medics were glad to answer any lingering questions that the students had, and also provide their perspectives on how the inspection process could be improved. Common concerns raised by the medics include certain equipment having similar-sounding names, and equipment with the same name differing in their expiry dates, both of which could lead to confusion. Some felt that regular checks might actually increase the risk of losing parts during the process of breaking seal.

Following this valuable visit, students had a better grasp of the customers’ needs and could begin brainstorming possible solutions. A big thank you to SAF MMI for allowing us the opportunity to enter the base and see the actual E-Trolley and learn first hand about the difficulties in inspecting them. We look forward to the seeing the solutions students will derive at IdeaLaunch!

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InnoVenture Solutioning Workshop – Ideas for Ideas http://ielstaging.net/iv-2018-solutioning-workshop/ Sat, 15 Sep 2018 15:01:36 +0000 http://ielstaging.net/?p=8335 The post InnoVenture Solutioning Workshop – Ideas for Ideas appeared first on Engineering Leadership - Institute for Engineering Leadership.

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